Get rid of that ugly cord hanging from your attic stairs

(I was one of the bloggers selected by True Value to work on the DIY Squad. I have been compensated for my time commitment to the program as well as writing about my experience. I have also been compensated for the materials needed for my DIY project. However, my opinions are entirely my own and I have not been paid to publish positive comments.)

I’m back today to share an easy update to an annoying problem. Do you have attic stairs that have a standard pull cord dangling down? They are just not attractive! Here’s a great and easy tutorial to update those attic stairs and get rid of the dangling cord.

Here are our attic stairs “before” the quick update.

The first thing I did was give all the woodwork a fresh coat of white trim paint using a small roller.

  

Now, to get rid of that cord. You will first need to collect a few supplies. For this project you will need a screw hook, an eye bolt, and a wooden dowel (no smaller than 3/4″ x 3′).

First step, remove the cord. Figure out how your cord is attached and cut it off. Be careful not to let your attic stairs close or it will be very difficult to open them at this point!

Using the new eye bolt, push it through the same hole the cord was in, and tighten the bolt firmly on the inside of the stairs. You may have to use a drill to make your hole slightly bigger if your eye bolt won’t fit.

Now it’s time to make a handle to access your new eye hook. Grab your dowel and your screw hook.

Drill a pilot hole into one end of the dowel.

Screw the hook into your pilot hole. You have now created your handle!

Use the handle to hook the eye bolt and pull down your stairs.

Obviously it would be super ugly to leave the handle just hanging there all the time, so you will need somewhere to store your handle when you aren’t using it.

I used a simple hook inside our hall closet to store our pull handle. Now any time I need to access the attic, I grab my handle out of the closet, attach it to the eye bolt in the attic stairs, and I’m ready to go!

Now when we look or walk down our hallway, we aren’t greeted with an unsightly cord hanging down. The attic stairs are hardly noticeable anymore.

Genius, right?! Head on over to True Value to pick up your supplies today. This little project shouldn’t take you more than about 30 minutes tops. Check out True Value Hardware for all your DIY needs.


     

Fresh paint in the master bathroom

I painted our master bathroom a year ago, and realized today that I never posted about it here. I wrote a post about it for True Value’s blog (original post here) but never ended up mentioning it here on my blog.

I gave our master bathroom a paint makeover. The small bathroom was previously painted a shade of salmon, an orangy redish color:

Paint is such a personal decision, and there are no wrong paint colors! The rule is, if you love it, and you love living in the space, then the color is perfect for YOU. I’ll admit though, I am not keen on this salmon color, so it had to go!

Because the room is so small, I knew I wanted a paint color that would brighten and enlarge the room. Obviously it isn’t going to physically make the room larger, but it will give the illusion that the space is bigger than it is.

I chose a very neutral light beige that brightens any room it touches. I’ve been using this color all over my entire house. It’s just a great neutral color that will compliment any accessories you decorate with. The color is called Stucco from Sherwin Williams.

Less than a day later, I have a brand-new bathroom! Or, at least it feels like a brand-new bathroom.

Choosing a light neutral color lightened, brightened, and widened the entire room. When we bought the house we thought we’d have to gut the whole room and start over, but just by changing out something as simple as paint color, we feel like we are living in a brand-new house.

I am no stranger to painting, and I tend to inadvertently purchase homes that have dark overwhelming colors (the worse the paint colors, the better the deal it seems). Painting rooms to lighten and brighten them has become a necessary past-time of mine. Check out these other rooms I’ve painted in an effort to make them feel bigger and more airy:

The dining room in our old house was purple and gold faux. I added a chair rail and a rich shade of gray and turned this eyesore into a stunner that opened up the room.

This guest bathroom was a goldish orange color. With a little paint and some bright accessories the room went from feeling like a dungeon to open and spacious, fit for any guest.

By adding some chair rail, box and window moulding, and a light neutral gray, this formal living room went from a depressing place we tried to avoid to one of our favorite rooms in the house.

You can transform the look and feel of an entire room simply by changing the paint color. Rich neutrals in lighter shades will really open up a small space and make it feel larger and more inviting.

Here are even more current pictures of the bathroom!

*****

PS I have a brand new post up on True Value’s blog. I did a little makeover on our guest bathroom involving beadboard! Yummy!

To see all my posts for True Value, click here.


     

How to make a Magnetic Frame to display artwork

(I was one of the bloggers selected by True Value to work on the DIY Squad. I have been compensated for my time commitment to the program as well as writing about my experience. I have also been compensated for the materials needed for my DIY project. However, my opinions are entirely my own and I have not been paid to publish positive comments.)

My daughter LOVES to draw and is very crafty. We have artwork all over our fridge and taped to the walls. I made her a magnetic frame for her to display all her artwork, photos, notes, and cards. It looks a lot classier on a magnetic frame instead of taped to the wall!

The frame is quite large. I wanted her to have enough space to display LOTS of artwork, not just a picture or two. Now she has plenty of room to expand her collection.

  

I couldn’t help but pull out some of my favorite old photos of her. Gah, she was just the most adorable little girl. Now she is 10! Time flies.

Here’s how to make your very own Magnetic Frame. I wanted something simple that I could make in a day. I started by purchasing a piece of magnetic sheet metal from True Value Hardware.

For the frame I used planks of MDF. These are 4″ wide that I had leftover from a previous project. Using the sheet metal as a guide, I cut the MDF with mitered edges, glued them together with wood glue, and then added some stapes on the seams on the back for added support. I let this dry overnight.

Once dry I lightly sanded the seams and all the edges.

I used some Painters Pyramids to support the frame while I sanded and painted it. These things are great and as you can see by how colorful they are, I use them frequently.

Once my frame was sanded, I added a coat of primer. MDF guzzles paint so it’s always a good idea to prime first. My favorite is Zinsser Bulls-Eye 1-2-3 Primer.

I let it sit for a few hours to completely dry before painting it. I used a leftover color – here is a similar one called Lemon Kiss at True Value. You can see in the picture below that I like to store extra touch-up paint in smaller glass jars. Much easier to use for small projects than a big metal paint can.

When the frame was dry I gave it a once-over with a can of satin clear top coat spray paint. Here is the exact type of top coat I like.

The sheet metal I purchased at True Value had a thin coating on it that I had to buff off with glass cleaner.

Once the frame was totally dry and the sheet metal was clean it was time to attach it to the frame. I did this using Liquid Nails.

I coated the inside perimeter of the frame with the Liquid Nails and then placed the sheet metal on top of the adhesive. I also set a few heavy paint cans on the corners of the frame to create a tight bond between the liquid nails and the frame.

From there it’s time to add the picture hangers. I love these picture hangers that you don’t need little tiny nails to attach. You simply hammer the picture hanger directly into the frame.

While I was making the frame Kinsey was busy making bottle cap magnets with a friend. She used leftover bottle caps, glued a magnet to the top of the bottle cap, flipped it over, decorated the inside of each cap, then gave it a good coating of mod podge dimensional magic. Aren’t they so adorable?!

From there it was just a matter of hanging it in her room and adding her creations!

I love all the little bottle cap magnets she made. It adds a nice finishing touch.

How do you display your kids artwork in your house? Artwork has a way of taking over the entire house. Have fun making your very own Magnetic Frame!

Check out all my other True Value projects here!


     
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